London Tube Map PDF

London Tube Map PDF Download

London Tube Map PDF Download for free using the direct download link given at the bottom of this article.

London Tube Map PDF Details
London Tube Map
PDF Name London Tube Map PDF
No. of Pages 1
PDF Size 0.23 MB
Language English
CategoryLifestyle
Source pdfsource.org
Download LinkAvailable ✔
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London Tube Map

Dear readers, here we are providing London Tube Map PDF to all of you. London is the capital of England and the United Kingdom. The total population of London is 89.8 lakhs as of 2019. The monarch, 96, was accompanied by her youngest son Prince Edward. The first published version of the Tube map was released in 1933.

Tube Maps are normally provided in PDF format online. This tool uses Sirv dynamic imaging to zoom fast into the image. The map is cut into thousands of small squares (tiles) and served on demand. If you also want to know about the updated map along with the new line then you can get it here.

London Tube Map PDF

Julie Dixon, TfL interim customer and revenue director, said: ‘Our world-renowned map now has another iconic addition in the Elizabeth Line, which will serve London and the southeast for hundreds of years to come. When we open on Tuesday, May 24, the new Elizabeth Line will begin providing greater connectivity and step-free access from Reading and Heathrow to Shenfield and Abbey Wood through the center of London.

‘This latest tube map is a real credit to the team who have put it together. It has been both a challenge and a privilege to update Harry Beck’s original design to literally put a new piece of transport history on the map. This latest version takes into account a number of wider changes to the transport network, but will ensure Londoners and visitors alike are able to navigate around our transport network with ease.’

The new Tube map will also be sponsored by Ikea for the next 12 months and shows the nearest public transport options to their stores. The new look has not drawn overwhelming praise from Londoners (what does?). One commentator on Twitter responded to TfL that ‘some of your stations appear to be doing the YMCA dance’, while Trixxy asked ‘Is Euston ok?’. That Ikea stores feature provoked ire from one user who noted ‘Who cares where the Ikea stores are?

You can hardly bring furniture home on the train.’ while Richie messaged ‘Ikea? On the Tube map? Only in London.’ Erm, that’s sort of the point. One of the things that seem to have prompted most debate is what actually constitutes a ‘tube’ versus interlopers such as Thameslink, DLR, Overground, etc. And whether it should technically be called the ‘Elizabeth Line line’ to standardize it with the other Underground lines. Our thinking? It’s a brilliant map to help get us around, and what rail and Underground networks identify as in their own sweet time is no concern of ours.

London Tube Map PDF Non-Underground lines on a Standard Map

Some non-Underground lines have appeared on the standard tube map:

  • On the early maps that used a geographic background, mainline railways were shown as part of the background detail.
  • Prior to its transfer to the London Underground in 1994, the Waterloo & City line was operated by British Rail and its mainline predecessors but has appeared on most Tube maps since the mid-1930s.
  • For a short period in the late 1930s to 1940, the section of the West London Line linking Willesden Junction to the Metropolitan line’s Middle Circle route at Uxbridge Road was shown as a service operated by the Great Western Railway and the London, Midland, and Scottish Railway. The service was removed when the line closed to passengers in 1940.
  • The North London Line was added to the map in 1977. Although run by British Rail and later by Silverlink, it was shown in British Rail/National Rail colors, but its appearance was intermittent and was omitted from some map editions over the years. In November 2007, the line was taken over by London Overground and changed to an orange double stripe. The semi-orbital route originally ran from Richmond to Broad Street and later Richmond to North Woolwich. The line runs now from Richmond to Stratford.
  • The West London Line, Watford DC Line, and Gospel Oak to Barking Line (former British Rail/Silverlink lines) were all added to the standard map in 2007 when they were taken over by London Overground, and all are shown as an orange double stripe.
  • The Northern City Line appeared on the original 1908 map as the Great Northern and City Railway. It later appeared as the Great Northern and City section of the Metropolitan Railway and then, from the late 1930s as part of the Northern line. The service was transferred to British Rail in 1975 and continued to appear until recently.
  • Thameslink reopened in 1988 after it had been closed for many years. It offers some relief to the Northern line, as it connects King’s Cross St Pancras to London Bridge. Only the central sections between Kentish Town and London Bridge/Elephant & Castle were shown. Its appearance on Tube maps had been intermittent since it had been omitted from some map editions over the years, before it was re-added to the official tube map in December 2020.
  • The Docklands Light Railway is the automatic light rail system in the London Docklands area.
  • The London Cable Car, linking Greenwich Peninsula and Royal Docks across the Thames, was added in December 2011.
  • The first section of the Crossrail franchise, TfL Rail, was added in May 2015.
  • Also in May 2015, the Chingford line, Enfield & Cheshunt line, and Romford–Upminster line were added to the London Overground network on the tube map.
  • Tramlink, shown in 2016 as London Trams, was included in the map from June 2016.
  • Elizabeth Line (Crossrail), which opened in 2022 was included in the map from May 2022 (shown in the 3 parts it opened with).

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